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Special Collections and Archives

William Taylor, Papers

William Taylor, Papers, War Propaganda Leaflets, [1940-1959?]

Finding Aid

Prepared by Jeffery Scaggs and James W. Geary, January 29, 1979
Prepared for the Web by Barbara Bass, August 20, 1996
1 document case, .5 cubic foot, 11th floor


Biographical Note

William David Taylor Jr. was born in Hartford, Kansas to William David and Bessie (Johnston) Taylor on December 25, 1903 [There are conflicting dates of birth on record. Who's Who in America prior to 1960 gives 1903 as the year; while the edition after 1960 lists 1899 as the year of birth]. With his family he moved to Spokane, Washington. He received an A.B. degree from the University of Washington in 1927 and an M.A. in 1931. He was Professor of Journalism at Kent State University from 1936-1968. He was also Chair of the School of Journalism for many years: 1936-1963. During World War II he took military leave from Kent State starting in June 1942. He served in the Army for three years, two of which were in the Southwest Pacific with the 14th Anti-Aircraft Command. In 1968 he was made Professor Emeritus, and in 1970 he was appointed to the Kent State University Board of Trustees. Among Professor Taylor's achievements were his short courses in news and photography and he was also co-editor of A Guide to the Tagalog Dialect in the Philippines. Professor Taylor died on November 3, 1975. For additional biographical information see an obituary in the Kent-Ravenna Record Courier, November 3, 1975, and also Who's Who in America, 38th edition.


Scope and Content

This collection was transferred to the Archives through the efforts of George Urban.

Parts of this collection were received attached to large posterboards (15" x 20") or small poster boards (10" x 15") while the remainder of the leaflets were loose. Both the large poster boards and the small poster boards were numbered. The large poster boards dealt with World War II while the small poster boards dealt with the Korean Conflict.

This collection has been arranged chronologically. The materials removed from the large poster boards and small poster boards were retained in sequence according to the numbers on them. Within the time periods (World War II, Korean Conflict or Cold War) the material is arranged according to language. The broad categories are as follows:

1. World War II
a. Folders #1-23: leaflets removed from large poster boards
b. Folders #24-36: leaflets were loose.
2. Korean Conflict
a. Folders #37-43: leaflets removed from small poster boards
b. Folders #44-53: loose material in Korean
c. Folders #54-58: loose material in Chinese
d. Folder #59: loose material , Communist
e. Folder #60: loose material, U. N. forces newspaper
3. Cold War in Europe
a. Folder #61: loose material

Oversized documents have been filed in the map case.


Folder -- Contents
  1. Forward to basic Psychological warfare in Pacific. Removed from poster board #1 (filed in map case).
  2. Leaflets, two identical leaflets, in English, from poster board #5. They announce return of General Douglas MacArthur.
  3. Leaflet removed from poster board #7. English proclamation to the people of the Philippines from General MacArthur announcing his return.
  4. Leaflet removed from poster board #8. A proclamation in English to the people of the Philippines from their President.
  5. Leaflets, two leaflets removed from poster board #10. Flag of U.S. and flag of the Philippines.
  6. Leaflets, two leaflets removed from poster board #11. Both are English proclamations from General MacArthur to the people of the Philippines.
  7. Leaflets, two identical leaflets removed for poster board #13. A message in English to the people of the Philippines from their President.
  8. Leaflets, two identical leaflets removed from poster board #14. Printed speech of the President of the Philippines in English.
  9. Leaflets, two leaflets and two description sheets removed from poster board #18. The pamphlets are identical and in Japanese. They charge that the Japanese people are not told the truth about the war.
  10. Leaflets, two identical leaflets and two description sheets removed from poster board #20. They are in Japanese and charge that Japan has lost control of the sea and air.
  11. Leaflets, two identical leaflets and one descriptive and one description sheet removed from poster board #21. They are in Japanese pointing out that Germany has fallen and Japan is next.
  12. Leaflets, two identical leaflets and three description sheets. Removed from poster board #23, in English.
  13. Leaflets, two identical leaflets and two description sheets removed from poster board #24. They are in Japanese showing tat General MacArthur is beating General Yamashita.
  14. Leaflets, two identical leaflets and one description sheet removed from poster board #25. They are in Japanese, dated June 16, 1945, and their purpose is to show the true picture of the war to the Japanese.
  15. Leaflet and description sheet removed from poster board #28. The are in Japanese and show that Manila has fallen to the U. S.
  16. Leaflets, two identical leaflets and one description sheet removed from poster board #29. The are in Japanese and are an appeal to surrender.
  17. Leaflets, two different leaflets and two description sheets. Removed from poster board #36, both in Japanese and showing that Japan is next.
  18. Leaflet and description sheet removed from poster board #39. They are in Japanese and are intended to make the Japanese soldier homesick.
  19. Leaflet and description sheet removed from poster board #41. In Japanese, telling the people that the military forces of Japan cannot stop the bombing of Japan.
  20. Leaflet and description sheet removed from poster board #42. In Japanese, showing that Japan is losing.
  21. Leaflets, series of four leaflets and one description sheet. Removed from poster board #43, in Japanese, questioning the war.
  22. Leaflets, two pair of leaflets with description sheet for each pair removed from poster board #44. Both in Japanese. The first is on ceasing resistance and the second explains unconditional surrender.
  23. Leaflets, two identical leaflets and one description sheet removed from poster board #46. In Japanese, announcing that Japan has surrendered.
  24. Leaflet and description sheet. In Japanese and English. It pertains to surrender leaflet.
  25. Leaflet and description sheet. In Japanese, asking the Japanese soldiers if they could respect their officers who had ordered barbaric acts.
  26. Leaflet and description sheet. In Japanese, the leaflet attempts to show the Japanese that the Americans have treated the people of Okinawa very well.
  27. Leaflet and description sheet. In Japanese, pointing out that it would be better to surrender than to suffer.
  28. Leaflets, two identical leaflets and description sheet. In Japanese, it is a letter from a Japanese POW to Japanese soldiers still fighting.
  29. Leaflet and description sheet. In Japanese, aimed at causing doubts of Japanese claims.
  30. Leaflet and description sheet. In Japanese, announcing that Japan's hour of doom is near.
  31. Leaflet and description sheet. In Japanese, telling that Japan's sources of material are being cut.
  32. Leaflet and description sheet. In Japanese, urging surrender.
  33. Leaflet and description sheet. In Japanese, announcing the end of the war in Europe.
  34. Leaflets, two identical leaflets. In English, giving the text of a radio speech given by the President of the Philippines.
  35. Leaflets. Three miscellaneous leaflets in Japanese.
  36. Brochure, in Japanese, with pictures of POWs.
  37. Leaflet and description sheet removed from the small poster board #1 (see inventory description for difference between "poster board" and small poster board"). The leaflet is in Korean and English and is a safe conduct pass to surrender with instructions of how to surrender.
  38. Leaflet and description sheet removed from the small poster board #4. They are in Korean and is a surrender appeal.
  39. Leaflet and description sheet removed from the small poster board #6. They are a surrender appeal in Korean.
  40. Leaflet and description sheet removed from the small poster board #7. In English and Korean, it is a safe conduct pass with a surrender appeal.
  41. Leaflet and description sheet removed from the small poster board #9. In Korean to warn civilians in North Korean cities that the cities would be bombed.
  42. Leaflet and description sheet removed from the small poster board #12. In Korean to give war news to civilians in North Korea.
  43. Leaflet and description sheet removed from small poster board #15. In English and Korean, it is a message from General MacArthur calling on the North Koreans to surrender.
  44. Leaflet and description sheet. In Korean to create self-pity and show hazards of winter warfare.
  45. Leaflet and description sheet. In Korean to depress the enemy soldier by reminding him of his family.
  46. Leaflet and description sheet. In Korean to tell that the U.N. symbol is a symbol of freedom and hope while the Communist symbol is of slavery and death.
  47. Leaflet and description sheet. In Korean, they stress good treatment if they surrender.
  48. Leaflet and description sheet. In Korean, they are aimed at North Korean partisans in South Korea.
  49. Leaflet and description sheet. In Korean to make Koreans in North Korea understand that the U.N. only wants to reunite Korea.
  50. Leaflet and description sheet. In Korean to give war news to the North Koreans.
  51. Leaflets, four identical leaflets in English and Korean. They are safe conduct passes with surrender appeal.
  52. Leaflet and description sheet. In Korean to the people of the Chiri-San area to explain martial law.
  53. Leaflet and description sheet. In Korean, they are aimed at North Korean guerrillas behind U.N. lines.
  54. Leaflet and description sheet. In Chinese, they are aimed at Chinese Communists in Korea and is a surrender appeal.
  55. Leaflet and description sheet. In Chinese, showing an escape route to surrender.
  56. Leaflet. In Chinese with picture of a woman thinking of a wounded soldier.
  57. Leaflets, two identical leaflets. In Chinese with U.N. symbol.
  58. Leaflet and description sheet. In Chinese to show the difference between Communism (slavery) and Democracy (freedom).
  59. Leaflet and description sheet. Three leaflets in English from Communists directed at the U.N. forces.
  60. The Frontline, December 16, 1951. It is a newspaper for the 3rd Infantry Division (U.N. forces).
  61. Leaflets. Two identical leaflets which were dropped in Eastern Europe via balloons.
 
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